FILM – Polaroid SX-70 Time Zero

CAMERA: Polaroid SX-70 Sonar Autofocus
FILM: Polaroid Time Zero Instant Film
I bought my Polaroid camera on eBay in December 2007, just months before Polaroid announced they were shutting down their instant film production, so I was disappointed to say the least. However, my old SX-70 came with 6 shots in camera and 1 box of expired Time Zero film (12/05), so I was ready to shoot straight out of the box. It was a whirlwind of learning for me as I had never shot this kind of instant film before AND the film leaked chemicals all over the rollers so I got some awesome, but unexpected, results. Once I had finished these films I waited for the new Impossible films to materialise, which I will cover in another post. Over the years I have reached for my beautiful SX-70 less and less, mostly due to high price per frame of the film which I just can’t justify in comparison to a roll of 36 shots on a 35mm film, or even buying Instax film cheap or in bulk. So for now I will just look back fondly on a time when Polaroid meant Polaroid, and leaky film was a joyous thing.
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©Jennifer Schussler

Leica M3 & Kodak Ultramax 400

CAMERA: Leica M3
FILM: Kodak Ultramax 400
When I was lent the Leica M3 I was so excited by the results I had in black and white that I wasn’t sure that it would do colour as wonderfully. Oh, how I proved myself wrong! I went to one of the usual places I go when testing out a camera or film, Kew Gardens. It was time for the Orchid Festival and having shot in the glasshouses before with my Holga, and having the images come out a bit dark, I was interested to see how the shots would come out with a bit more control over shutter speed and aperture.
I haven’t shot too much with this film and I was delighted at the colours that came back, helped by the sharpness and accuracy the Leica provides. I have also been trying to gain more confidence in taking photos of people as my comfort lies in plants and architecture, so the Leica helped in the quietness of the shutter to get closer to my subjects. One even waved, from afar though so isn’t immediately obvious in the photo.
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©Jennifer Schussler

HOLGA 120CFN & Ilford HP5+400

CAMERA: Holga 120CFN
FILM: Ilford HP5+ 400
DEVELOP: Ilford chemicals, at home
SCAN: Epson V700
I haven’t shot a roll of black & white film with my Holga for a while, so I took it out a couple of times to try and get a roll done. I also haven’t used HP5 before, I have mixed feelings about the results, a bit too dark and a bit too light with this camera. It was the first time I have tried to develop my own 120 film at home, the last time I did this was about 9 years ago in high school, and it was so different trying to load the film with a changing bag rather than a darkroom. So you may notice some dents, I really had to fight to get the film spooled! Don’t think I will put myself under that kind of stress again any time soon, back to 35mm.

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©Jennifer Schussler